Why?

Because voting isn’t enough. 

Because our political institutions have created insular environments that aren’t responsive, reflective or accepting of the broader political and social views which exist in the United States.

Because political careerism and party/interest-driven candidacies force a system that perpetuates the status-quo rather than openly accommodating and encouraging different viewpoints towards innovation and change.

Because local governments often see turnout rates of 10-15% in their elections, but play a leading role or in charge of in police, fire, emergency medical services, libraries and senior and community centers, road repair, plowing and public infrastructure maintenance, downtown and business hubs, transit options and system, housing and housing policy, schools and education, homelessness, mental health, business support, cost of living, environmental concerns, individual economic opportunity and so much more – all which give tremendous potential to make government work better, bring more people into the civic process, and set an example for others.

Because the opportunity to make systems-level change in how we govern is nowhere greater than through effective, innovative and ethical public service.

Because voting is not enough to change government if we don’t change who runs for office.

 

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A few of us making the case: